Angel Hair:
"Clusters of web-like material that mysteriously fall from the sky. Various people in different countries have reported the falling from the sky of clusters of fine filaments, usually compared to fine string or cobwebs, often covering large areas of ground. This material is said to quickly disappear, particular if touched."

Angel Hair:

"Clusters of web-like material that mysteriously fall from the sky. Various people in different countries have reported the falling from the sky of clusters of fine filaments, usually compared to fine string or cobwebs, often covering large areas of ground. This material is said to quickly disappear, particular if touched."

Agogwe: 
"A short hairy bipedal humanoid entity reported from Tanzania, with counterparts on record elsewhere tropical Africa. Tanzanian Tribes have long spoken of a rarely seen but remarkable forest-dwelling humanoid entity known as the agigwen, which walks upright on it’s hind legs, lacks a tail, and resembles a short man, roughly 1.2-1.5 meters (4-5 feet) tall, but is covered in brown or dark red fur."

Agogwe:

"A short hairy bipedal humanoid entity reported from Tanzania, with counterparts on record elsewhere tropical Africa. Tanzanian Tribes have long spoken of a rarely seen but remarkable forest-dwelling humanoid entity known as the agigwen, which walks upright on it’s hind legs, lacks a tail, and resembles a short man, roughly 1.2-1.5 meters (4-5 feet) tall, but is covered in brown or dark red fur."


It tells the story of four wealthy male libertines who resolve to experience the ultimate sexual gratification in orgies. To do this, they seal themselves away for four months in an inaccessible castle in Saint-Martin-de-Belleville, France, with a harem of 46 victims, mostly young male and female teenagers, and engage four female brothel keepers to tell the stories of their lives and adventures. The women’s narratives form an inspiration for the sexual abuse and torture of the victims, which gradually mounts in intensity and ends in their slaughter.


The movie is called “120 days of sodom" in English

It tells the story of four wealthy male libertines who resolve to experience the ultimate sexual gratification in orgies. To do this, they seal themselves away for four months in an inaccessible castle in Saint-Martin-de-Belleville, France, with a harem of 46 victims, mostly young male and female teenagers, and engage four female brothel keepers to tell the stories of their lives and adventures. The women’s narratives form an inspiration for the sexual abuse and torture of the victims, which gradually mounts in intensity and ends in their slaughter.

The movie is called “120 days of sodom" in English

The Dybbuk Box:

 is the commonly used name of a wine cabinet which is said to be haunted by a dybbuk, a spirit from Jewish folklore. The legend of the box originated in a story written as an eBay auction listing by Kevin Mannis. Mannis purportedly bought the Box at an estate sale in 2001. It had belonged to a Polish Holocaust survivor named Havela, who had escaped to Spain and purchased it there before emigrating to the United States. Havela’s granddaughter told Mannis that the Box had been kept in her grandmother’s sewing room and was never opened because a dybbuk was said to live inside it. He offered to give the box back to her, but she became upset and refused to take it.
On opening the box, Mannis found that it contained two 1920s pennies, a lock of blonde hair bound with cord, a lock of black/brown hair bound with cord, a small statue engraved with the Hebrew word “Shalom”, a small, golden wine goblet, one dried rose bud, and a single candle holder with four octopus-shaped legs.
Numerous owners of the box have reported that strange phenomena accompany it. His mother is supposed to have suffered a stroke on the same day he gave her the box as a birthday present. Every owner of the Box has reported that smells of cat urine or jasmine flowers and nightmares involving an old hag accompany the Box. Iosif Neitzke, a Minnesota college student and the last person to auction the box on eBay, claimed that the box caused lights to burn out in his house and his hair to fall out. Neitzke sold it to Jason Haxton, Director of the Museum of Osteopathic Medicine in Kirksville, Missouri. Haxton, who wrote The Dibbuk Box, and claimed that he subsequently developed strange health problems, including hives, coughing up blood, and “head-to-toe welts.”

The Dybbuk Box:

 is the commonly used name of a wine cabinet which is said to be haunted by a dybbuk, a spirit from Jewish folkloreThe legend of the box originated in a story written as an eBay auction listing by Kevin Mannis. Mannis purportedly bought the Box at an estate sale in 2001. It had belonged to a Polish Holocaust survivor named Havela, who had escaped to Spain and purchased it there before emigrating to the United States. Havela’s granddaughter told Mannis that the Box had been kept in her grandmother’s sewing room and was never opened because a dybbuk was said to live inside it. He offered to give the box back to her, but she became upset and refused to take it.

On opening the box, Mannis found that it contained two 1920s pennies, a lock of blonde hair bound with cord, a lock of black/brown hair bound with cord, a small statue engraved with the Hebrew word “Shalom”, a small, golden wine goblet, one dried rose bud, and a single candle holder with four octopus-shaped legs.

Numerous owners of the box have reported that strange phenomena accompany it. His mother is supposed to have suffered a stroke on the same day he gave her the box as a birthday present. Every owner of the Box has reported that smells of cat urine or jasmine flowers and nightmares involving an old hag accompany the Box. Iosif Neitzke, a Minnesota college student and the last person to auction the box on eBay, claimed that the box caused lights to burn out in his house and his hair to fall out. Neitzke sold it to Jason Haxton, Director of the Museum of Osteopathic Medicine in Kirksville, Missouri. Haxton, who wrote The Dibbuk Box, and claimed that he subsequently developed strange health problems, including hives, coughing up blood, and “head-to-toe welts.”

Toxoplasma gondii:
is a species of parasitic protozoa. The definitive host of T. gondii is the cat, but the parasite can be carried by many warm-blooded animals (birds or mammals, including humans). T. gondii infections have the ability to change the behavior of rats and mice, making them drawn to, rather than fearful of, the scent of cats. This effect is advantageous to the parasite, which will be able to sexually reproduce if its host is eaten by a cat. The infection is widespread in the brain, with more cysts targeting the parts of the brain corresponding to fear. The widespread nature of the infection causes many previously unnoticed symptoms in the rats. 
Scientists at Oxford University discovered that the parasite changes the rats in one subtle but vital way:

Rats carrying the parasite are for the most part indistinguishable from healthy ones. They can compete for mates just as well and have no trouble feeding themselves. The only difference, the researchers found, is that they are more likely to get themselves killed. The scent of a cat in the enclosure didn’t make them anxious, and they went about their business as if nothing was bothering them. They would explore around the odor at least as often as they did anywhere else in the enclosure. In some cases, they even took a special interest in the spot and came back to it over and over again.

In other words guys, this parasite makes it’s host want to kill itself. Now imagine if there was something like that in humans…

Toxoplasma gondii:

is a species of parasitic protozoa. The definitive host of T. gondii is the cat, but the parasite can be carried by many warm-blooded animals (birds or mammals, including humans). T. gondii infections have the ability to change the behavior of rats and mice, making them drawn to, rather than fearful of, the scent of cats. This effect is advantageous to the parasite, which will be able to sexually reproduce if its host is eaten by a cat. The infection is widespread in the brain, with more cysts targeting the parts of the brain corresponding to fear. The widespread nature of the infection causes many previously unnoticed symptoms in the rats. 

Scientists at Oxford University discovered that the parasite changes the rats in one subtle but vital way:

Rats carrying the parasite are for the most part indistinguishable from healthy ones. They can compete for mates just as well and have no trouble feeding themselves. The only difference, the researchers found, is that they are more likely to get themselves killed. The scent of a cat in the enclosure didn’t make them anxious, and they went about their business as if nothing was bothering them. They would explore around the odor at least as often as they did anywhere else in the enclosure. In some cases, they even took a special interest in the spot and came back to it over and over again.

In other words guys, this parasite makes it’s host want to kill itself. Now imagine if there was something like that in humans…

Cordyceps Fungus - The mind-control Killer-Fungi (Part 2):


The Cordyceps is a family of mind-altering fungi that slowly takes over the body of an insect and eventually kills it by growing out of it’s head.

The Keddie Murders:


is an unsolved 1981 American quadruple murder that took place in Keddie, a former resort town in the foothills of Northern California’s Sierra Nevada mountains. Glenna “Sue” Sharp, 36, and her five children had been renting the cabin since November 1980. On the night of April 11, 1981, Sue was home with her daughter, Tina, her two youngest boys, and a young friend of the boys, Justin, who was staying the night. Her oldest son, John, and his friend Dana Wingate, had spent the day in nearby Quincy and were also going to stay the night at cabin 28. John and Dana were last seen hitchhiking from Quincy to Keddie. The crime may already have been in progress when they arrived at the cabin. At approximately 8 am on the morning of April 12, Sheila Sharp, upon returning from the sleepover next door, discovered the bodies of Sue, John and Dana in the cabin’s living room. All three victims had been bound with medical tape and electrical appliance wire.

Examination of the bodies determined that each of the victims had been bludgeoned with a claw hammer, and Sue and John had been stabbed repeatedly, including both being stabbed once in the throat. An inexpensive steak knife discovered at the scene had been used so forcefully that the blade had bent approximately 25 degrees. In 1984 the cranium portion of Tina Sharp’s skull was recovered near Camp Eighteen, a geodesic distance of roughly 29 miles from Keddie. Months later, after an anonymous caller to the Butte County Sheriff’s office claimed the skull was Tina’s, the Camp Eighteen area was searched again for several hours over a period of days. The jawbone and dozens of other bones were found, along with other potential evidence. From these discoveries, no new information regarding the crime surfaced in the media. The murders remain unsolved to this day.

The Keddie Murders:

is an unsolved 1981 American quadruple murder that took place in Keddie, a former resort town in the foothills of Northern California’s Sierra Nevada mountainsGlenna “Sue” Sharp, 36, and her five children had been renting the cabin since November 1980. On the night of April 11, 1981, Sue was home with her daughter, Tina, her two youngest boys, and a young friend of the boys, Justin, who was staying the night. Her oldest son, John, and his friend Dana Wingate, had spent the day in nearby Quincy and were also going to stay the night at cabin 28. John and Dana were last seen hitchhiking from Quincy to Keddie. The crime may already have been in progress when they arrived at the cabin. At approximately 8 am on the morning of April 12, Sheila Sharp, upon returning from the sleepover next door, discovered the bodies of Sue, John and Dana in the cabin’s living room. All three victims had been bound with medical tape and electrical appliance wire.

Examination of the bodies determined that each of the victims had been bludgeoned with a claw hammer, and Sue and John had been stabbed repeatedly, including both being stabbed once in the throat. An inexpensive steak knife discovered at the scene had been used so forcefully that the blade had bent approximately 25 degrees. In 1984 the cranium portion of Tina Sharp’s skull was recovered near Camp Eighteen, a geodesic distance of roughly 29 miles from Keddie. Months later, after an anonymous caller to the Butte County Sheriff’s office claimed the skull was Tina’s, the Camp Eighteen area was searched again for several hours over a period of days. The jawbone and dozens of other bones were found, along with other potential evidence. From these discoveries, no new information regarding the crime surfaced in the media. The murders remain unsolved to this day.

Camp Scott murders:

 - Camp Scott is a 410-acre (1.7 km2) compound that is located in the US state of Oklahoma.  The former Girl Scout camp is situated along the Snake and Spring Creeks near State Highway 82, in Mayes County.  In 1977, Camp Scott entered its 49th year as a keystone in the Girls Scouts of America program.  The annual summer camp began on June 12, 1977.  Around 6pm on the first day of camp, a large thunder storm struck the area.  This caused the dozens of campers to huddle inside their tents for the entire evening.  Inside of tent #8 in the Kiowa unit, housed three small girls named Lori Lee Farmer, 8, Doris Denise Milner, 10, and Michele Guse, 9.  What happened next cannot be adequately described.  The following morning, a camp counselor discovered the lifeless bodies of all three girls.  They had been raped, bludgeoned, and murdered.  The victim’s bodies were scattered over the surrounding forest land.  The event remains one of the worst mass murders in the history of Oklahoma. 
In the weeks before the murders, strange events took place around Camp Scott.  Personal items began disappearing from the cabins and tents.  In one incident, a counselor reported that her doughnuts had been stolen, and inside the empty doughnut box was a disturbing hand-written note.  The author vowed to “murder three campers in tent 1.”  Because summer camps are rife with ghost stories, the note was treated as a prank and discarded.  After the murders, Oklahoma police launched one of the largest manhunts in US history.  Detectives ultimately focused their attention on a man named Gene Leroy Hart, who had been free since escaping from the Mayes County Jail four years earlier.  He had previously been convicted of raping two pregnant women.  Hart was arrested and tried for the crimes, but was ultimately acquitted of the killings in 1979.  Later that year he died of a heart attack while in prison. 
During the publicized trial, the camp underwent many accusations, stemming from the fact that the girl’s tent was 86-yard (79 m) from any counselors.  Other campers reported that they witnessed a man peeking in their tents on the evening of the murders.  The day following the incident, Camp Scott was closed forever.  To date, the Oklahoma Girl Scout Murders remain unsolved and DNA testing has returned inconclusive results.  However, something is said to remain on the grounds of Camp Scott.  It has been claimed that when a heavy rain falls, the eerie sound of small girls crying can be heard.  Dark shadows are said to lurk and the sensation of someone walking around you has been reported.  Only true thrill seekers will stay a night within the walls of the Camp Scott compound.  In an interesting twist, the original Friday the 13th film was released in 1980, which is only three years after the violent murders.  The movie franchise has helped insert an urban legend in popular culture that summer camps are creepy and dangerous.  Camp Scott just might be.

Camp Scott murders:

Camp Scott is a 410-acre (1.7 km2) compound that is located in the US state of Oklahoma.  The former Girl Scout camp is situated along the Snake and Spring Creeks near State Highway 82, in Mayes County.  In 1977, Camp Scott entered its 49th year as a keystone in the Girls Scouts of America program.  The annual summer camp began on June 12, 1977.  Around 6pm on the first day of camp, a large thunder storm struck the area.  This caused the dozens of campers to huddle inside their tents for the entire evening.  Inside of tent #8 in the Kiowa unit, housed three small girls named Lori Lee Farmer, 8, Doris Denise Milner, 10, and Michele Guse, 9.  What happened next cannot be adequately described.  The following morning, a camp counselor discovered the lifeless bodies of all three girls.  They had been raped, bludgeoned, and murdered.  The victim’s bodies were scattered over the surrounding forest land.  The event remains one of the worst mass murders in the history of Oklahoma. 

In the weeks before the murders, strange events took place around Camp Scott.  Personal items began disappearing from the cabins and tents.  In one incident, a counselor reported that her doughnuts had been stolen, and inside the empty doughnut box was a disturbing hand-written note.  The author vowed to “murder three campers in tent 1.”  Because summer camps are rife with ghost stories, the note was treated as a prank and discarded.  After the murders, Oklahoma police launched one of the largest manhunts in US history.  Detectives ultimately focused their attention on a man named Gene Leroy Hart, who had been free since escaping from the Mayes County Jail four years earlier.  He had previously been convicted of raping two pregnant women.  Hart was arrested and tried for the crimes, but was ultimately acquitted of the killings in 1979.  Later that year he died of a heart attack while in prison. 

During the publicized trial, the camp underwent many accusations, stemming from the fact that the girl’s tent was 86-yard (79 m) from any counselors.  Other campers reported that they witnessed a man peeking in their tents on the evening of the murders.  The day following the incident, Camp Scott was closed forever.  To date, the Oklahoma Girl Scout Murders remain unsolved and DNA testing has returned inconclusive results.  However, something is said to remain on the grounds of Camp Scott.  It has been claimed that when a heavy rain falls, the eerie sound of small girls crying can be heard.  Dark shadows are said to lurk and the sensation of someone walking around you has been reported.  Only true thrill seekers will stay a night within the walls of the Camp Scott compound.  In an interesting twist, the original Friday the 13th film was released in 1980, which is only three years after the violent murders.  The movie franchise has helped insert an urban legend in popular culture that summer camps are creepy and dangerous.  Camp Scott just might be.

Robert John Maudsley:

You may not know who he is, but if you saw his prison cell in Wakefield, West Yorkshire, England, you would instantly recognize that he was Thomas Harris’ primary inspiration for Dr. Hannibal Lecter. As described in the novels and in the Anthony Hopkins films, the cell is solitary confinement, underground, through multiple, locked checkpoints with armed guards, and the Prison officials take such care to secure Maudsley because he is, in reality, no less the monster that Hannibal Lecter is.

He is not as smart or well educated as the character based on him, but he is the pristine definition of a pure sociopath. He has absolutely zero interest in either the sanctity of human life, or the rules of any society. He does not kill for enjoyment, at least as determined by his many psychological evaluators. He kills because he feels it is his duty. The very presence of another person obliges Maudsley to desire to kill that person, and to try if he thinks he can succeed.
Although it certainly doesn’t justify what he did, Maudsley’s sociopathy stems from being beaten horribly by both parents throughout most of his childhood. He claims to have been raped by his father, before social services rescued him. By then it was too late. He was incarcerated for strangling a man who attempted to pick him up for sex, then showed him pictures of children the man had sexually abused.
While in Broadmoor Hospital for the Criminally Insane, surrounded by pedophiles, he decided to take it on himself to kill as many of them as he could. He and another inmate captured one pedophile and locked themselves in his cell, where they tortured him for an hour, breaking all his arms and legs, castrating him, and finally smashing his skull open, killing him. Maudsley then got the nickname “Hannibal the Cannibal” when he ate some of the prisoner’s brain with a spoon.
This incident got him transferred to Wakefield, “the Monster Mansion,” where all the very worst, most violent prisoners in the UK are held. One day in 1978, he lured a rapist named Salney Darwood into his cell, where he stabbed and strangled him. He hid the body and attempted to repeat his tactic, but no other inmate wanted to enter his cell. Several of them testified that they “saw death in his eyes.”
Maudsley would not be deterred, walking around the prison until he found a random prisoner alone, stabbed him and bashed his head against a wall, then walked into the guardroom and gave them the shank he used. “Your next roll will be two men short,” he said. The guards stated that he smiled and laughed a little as he walked out. Since then, he has been kept in his “Silence of the Lambs” cell.
Guards, and even the other inmates, are terrified of him escaping. Once, in 1984, when a new guard attempted to open his cell, Maudsley snickered and said, “Look, if you come in here, I’m going to have to kill you. It’s not personal. I don’t hate you and I’m not angry. It’s just something I’ll have to do.” The guard quit his job and visited a psychiatrist. The prison’s psychiatric experts have labeled Maudsley “100% psychopath. He only regards the rules of society because, in his case, those rules are made of brick.”

Robert John Maudsley:

You may not know who he is, but if you saw his prison cell in Wakefield, West Yorkshire, England, you would instantly recognize that he was Thomas Harris’ primary inspiration for Dr. Hannibal Lecter. As described in the novels and in the Anthony Hopkins films, the cell is solitary confinement, underground, through multiple, locked checkpoints with armed guards, and the Prison officials take such care to secure Maudsley because he is, in reality, no less the monster that Hannibal Lecter is.

He is not as smart or well educated as the character based on him, but he is the pristine definition of a pure sociopath. He has absolutely zero interest in either the sanctity of human life, or the rules of any society. He does not kill for enjoyment, at least as determined by his many psychological evaluators. He kills because he feels it is his duty. The very presence of another person obliges Maudsley to desire to kill that person, and to try if he thinks he can succeed.

Although it certainly doesn’t justify what he did, Maudsley’s sociopathy stems from being beaten horribly by both parents throughout most of his childhood. He claims to have been raped by his father, before social services rescued him. By then it was too late. He was incarcerated for strangling a man who attempted to pick him up for sex, then showed him pictures of children the man had sexually abused.

While in Broadmoor Hospital for the Criminally Insane, surrounded by pedophiles, he decided to take it on himself to kill as many of them as he could. He and another inmate captured one pedophile and locked themselves in his cell, where they tortured him for an hour, breaking all his arms and legs, castrating him, and finally smashing his skull open, killing him. Maudsley then got the nickname “Hannibal the Cannibal” when he ate some of the prisoner’s brain with a spoon.

This incident got him transferred to Wakefield, “the Monster Mansion,” where all the very worst, most violent prisoners in the UK are held. One day in 1978, he lured a rapist named Salney Darwood into his cell, where he stabbed and strangled him. He hid the body and attempted to repeat his tactic, but no other inmate wanted to enter his cell. Several of them testified that they “saw death in his eyes.”

Maudsley would not be deterred, walking around the prison until he found a random prisoner alone, stabbed him and bashed his head against a wall, then walked into the guardroom and gave them the shank he used. “Your next roll will be two men short,” he said. The guards stated that he smiled and laughed a little as he walked out. Since then, he has been kept in his “Silence of the Lambs” cell.

Guards, and even the other inmates, are terrified of him escaping. Once, in 1984, when a new guard attempted to open his cell, Maudsley snickered and said, “Look, if you come in here, I’m going to have to kill you. It’s not personal. I don’t hate you and I’m not angry. It’s just something I’ll have to do.” The guard quit his job and visited a psychiatrist. The prison’s psychiatric experts have labeled Maudsley “100% psychopath. He only regards the rules of society because, in his case, those rules are made of brick.”

Roopkund (Skeleton Lake):
 is a glacial lake in Uttarakhand state of India famous due to more than five hundred human skeletons found at the edge of the lake. The location is uninhabited and is located in Himalaya at an altitude of about 5,029 metres (16,499 feet). The human skeletons were rediscovered in 1942 by a Nanda Devi game reserve ranger H. K. Madhwal, although there are reports about these bones from late 19th century. Earlier it was believed by specialists that the people died from an epidemic, landslide or blizzard. The carbon dating from samples collected in the 1960s vaguely indicated that the people were from the 12th century to the 15th century. After studying fractures in the skulls, the scientists in Hyderabad, Pune and London determined that the people died not of disease, but of a sudden hailstorm. The hailstones were as large as cricket balls, and with no shelter in the open Himalayas, many, or possibly all of them, perished. Furthermore, with the rarefied air and icy conditions, many bodies were well preserved.

What is not determined was where the group was headed to. There is no historical evidence of any trade routes to Tibet in the area.

Roopkund (Skeleton Lake):

is a glacial lake in Uttarakhand state of India famous due to more than five hundred human skeletons found at the edge of the lake. The location is uninhabited and is located in Himalaya at an altitude of about 5,029 metres (16,499 feet). The human skeletons were rediscovered in 1942 by a Nanda Devi game reserve ranger H. K. Madhwal, although there are reports about these bones from late 19th century. Earlier it was believed by specialists that the people died from an epidemiclandslide or blizzard. The carbon dating from samples collected in the 1960s vaguely indicated that the people were from the 12th century to the 15th century. After studying fractures in the skulls, the scientists in HyderabadPune and London determined that the people died not of disease, but of a sudden hailstorm. The hailstones were as large as cricket balls, and with no shelter in the open Himalayas, many, or possibly all of them, perished. Furthermore, with the rarefied air and icy conditions, many bodies were well preserved.


What is not determined was where the group was headed to. There is no historical evidence of any trade routes to Tibet in the area.