Yep I broke down and bought it!
:-)

Gilles de Rais:
Gilles de Laval, Baron de Rais, was a 15th century french marshal with a side hobby of satanism and the murder and rape of children. At an early age Gilles distinguished himself militarily, fighting first in the wars of succession to the duchy of Brittany (1420) and then for the Duchess of Anjou against the English in 1427. He was assigned to Joan of Arc's guard and fought several battles at her side, including the relief of Orleans in 1429. He accompanied her to Reims for the consecration of Charles VII, who made him marshal of France. He continued to serve in Joan of Arc's special guard and was at her side when Paris was attacked. After her capture, he retired to his lands in Brittany. Inheriting extensive domains from both his father and his maternal grandfather (Guy de Laval and Jean de Craon, respectively), de Rais had also married a rich heiress, Catherine de Thouars (1420). He kept a more lavish court than the king, dissipating his wealth on the decoration of his ch?aux and the maintenance of a large train of servants, heralds, and priests. He was a munificent patron of music, literature, and pageants, in one of which he figured (The Mystery of Orl?s). When his family secured a decree from the king in July 1435, restraining him from selling or mortgaging the rest of his lands, he turned to alchemy. He also developed an interest in satanism, hoping to gain knowledge, power, and riches by invoking the devil, such as searching for the famous Philosopher’s stone. Gilles was eventually brought before the Inquisition after he insulted the brother of the Treasurer of Brittany. Forty-seven charges were brought against him in three categories: ‘abuse of clerical privilege (for attacking a priest), ‘the conjuration of demons’ and sexual perversions against children. After hearing one hundred and ten witnesses the court decided to put Gilles and his servants under torture to extract more incriminating evidence from them. One of his servants called Etienne Corillait testified:"…to practise his debauches with the said boys and girls, against the dictation of nature, he first took his rod in his hand and rubbed it so it became erect and sticking out; then placing it between the limbs of the boys or girls, not bothering with the natural female receptacle, and rubbed his rod or virile member on the belly of the said boys and girls with much libidinous excitement until he emitted his sperm on their stomachs…. …he had cosiderable pleasure in watching the heads of children separated from their bodies. Sometimes he made an incision behind the neck to make them die slowly, at which he became very excited, and while they were bleeding to death he would sometimes masturbate on them, and sometimes he would do this after they had died and their bodies were still warm….  …sometimes he would ask, when they were dead, which of them had the most beautiful head.” Even by the standards of the Inquisition, the trial of Gilles de Rais was a farce. Most of the incriminating evidence came under the conditions of torture or was given out of self-interest or spite. Eventually Gilles himself succumbed to torture and admitted whatever the court told him. He was executed by garrotte and thrown onto a pyre, although his family were allowed to remove the body before it was lit. Although it is certain that Gilles was one of Europe’s worst child rapist and murderers, it is doubtful that his death toll ever reached as high as the 500 to 800 that is quoted.

Gilles de Rais:

Gilles de Laval, Baron de Rais, was a 15th century french marshal with a side hobby of satanism and the murder and rape of children.

At an early age Gilles distinguished himself militarily, fighting first in the wars of succession to the duchy of Brittany (1420) and then for the Duchess of Anjou against the English in 1427. He was assigned to Joan of Arc's guard and fought several battles at her side, including the relief of Orleans in 1429. He accompanied her to Reims for the consecration of Charles VII, who made him marshal of France. He continued to serve in Joan of Arc's special guard and was at her side when Paris was attacked. After her capture, he retired to his lands in Brittany.

Inheriting extensive domains from both his father and his maternal grandfather (Guy de Laval and Jean de Craon, respectively), de Rais had also married a rich heiress, Catherine de Thouars (1420). He kept a more lavish court than the king, dissipating his wealth on the decoration of his ch?aux and the maintenance of a large train of servants, heralds, and priests. He was a munificent patron of music, literature, and pageants, in one of which he figured (The Mystery of Orl?s). When his family secured a decree from the king in July 1435, restraining him from selling or mortgaging the rest of his lands, he turned to alchemy. He also developed an interest in satanism, hoping to gain knowledge, power, and riches by invoking the devil, such as searching for the famous Philosopher’s stone.

Gilles was eventually brought before the Inquisition after he insulted the brother of the Treasurer of Brittany. Forty-seven charges were brought against him in three categories: ‘abuse of clerical privilege (for attacking a priest), ‘the conjuration of demons’ and sexual perversions against children.

After hearing one hundred and ten witnesses the court decided to put Gilles and his servants under torture to extract more incriminating evidence from them. One of his servants called Etienne Corillait testified:

"…to practise his debauches with the said boys and girls, against the dictation of nature, he first took his rod in his hand and rubbed it so it became erect and sticking out; then placing it between the limbs of the boys or girls, not bothering with the natural female receptacle, and rubbed his rod or virile member on the belly of the said boys and girls with much libidinous excitement until he emitted his sperm on their stomachs….

…he had cosiderable pleasure in watching the heads of children separated from their bodies. Sometimes he made an incision behind the neck to make them die slowly, at which he became very excited, and while they were bleeding to death he would sometimes masturbate on them, and sometimes he would do this after they had died and their bodies were still warm….

…sometimes he would ask, when they were dead, which of them had the most beautiful head.”


Even by the standards of the Inquisition, the trial of Gilles de Rais was a farce. Most of the incriminating evidence came under the conditions of torture or was given out of self-interest or spite. Eventually Gilles himself succumbed to torture and admitted whatever the court told him. He was executed by garrotte and thrown onto a pyre, although his family were allowed to remove the body before it was lit.

Although it is certain that Gilles was one of Europe’s worst child rapist and murderers, it is doubtful that his death toll ever reached as high as the 500 to 800 that is quoted.

The Moving Coffins of Barbados:
 There is a famous legend on the island of Barbados of coffins that are moved by unknown forces. Though the details surrounding the phenomenon are sketchy, the enigma is one that has fascinated researchers for over a century.The events took place in the Chase Vault, located in a West Indian cemetery. The vault, situated about seven miles from Bridgetown, is a large structure built for the Chase family and their close friends. It was built roughly half above and half below the ground, which allowed for some degree of protection from the elements.The vault was slowly filled with the dead members of the Chase family. The first placed inside the vault was Mrs. Thomasina Goddard, in a simple wooden coffin built in July, 1807. Two-year-old Mary Ann Chase was placed in the vault the very next year. The older sister of Mary Ann, Dorcas Chase, was put into the vault on July 6, 1812. Some claim that Dorcas starved herself after her father forced her into depression. Nonetheless, a few weeks later her father, Thomas Chase, was placed into the vault. Legend says that Thomas was one of the most hated men in Barbados. When the Chase Vault was open for the burial of Thomas the funeral party was stunned to find that none of the coffins were in the proper place. The group was angered- the theory being that grave robbers found a way into the grave and tossed the coffins about in search of loot. The entrance was a problem for robbers- a gigantic rock slab was cemented in place, covering the only entrance. Each time the vault was opened the cement had to chipped away and several men were needed to move the rock. Eventually it was decided that the gravediggers had some how disturbed the coffins. The coffins were replaced and the lead coffin of Thomas Chase was put in place. The vault was then resealed as it had been before. On September 25, 1816 the vault was opened for the burial of eleven-year-old Charles Brewster Ames. Similar to the previous instance, each of the coffins was misplaced and thrown about- including the two hundred forty pound coffin of Thomas was thrown from its resting place! The vault was put back in order and resealed once again. Fifty-two days later, Samuel Brewster was to be buried. This time a large group of witnesses crowded the scene looking for the mystery to continue. The slab of stone, which covered the door, was carefully examined. No defects were found, and the vault was opened. To no ones surprised the vault was once again in disorder. Mrs. Goddard’s coffin, the only wooden one placed in the vault, was badly damaged. It was wrapped in wire to keep it together. Several investigators, including the Reverend Thomas Oderson, examined the vault. Nothing could be found that would indicate a cause for the strange happenings, so the vault was once again cleaned and sealed. On July 17, 1819 the vault was once again opened and once again the vault was found to be in disorder. The only coffin untouched was the wooden and fragile one of Mrs. Goddard’s. This time, the governor of the island, Lord Combermere, ordered his own professional investigation. The entire vault was looked over, and nothing strange could be found. The coffins were restacked and sand was placed on the floor to catch the footprints of the perpetrators. Mrs. Goddard’s wooden coffin was stacked against a wall since it was so frail. The vault was then resealed and personal seals of the governor were placed on concrete. Everyone of the island waited for the next reopening. The next opening of the vault was not for a burial but for the Governor’s curiosity. On April 18, 1820, the Governor and several friends traveled to the vault and found his seal unbroken. When the vault was opened, however, it was found that the coffins were in disarray - some were even flipped upside down! The sand revealed no footprints. The coffins were promptly removed from the vault and buried elsewhere on the island. Upon inspection, the vault was found to contain no water, and no way for water to enter it. Earthquakes were also eliminated- why would the quakes only affect one section of the chamber and leave the wooden coffin alone? Some have speculated that the entire event never took place. Records show, however, that the Chase vault has and did exist. The vault is and has been for sometime? empty.

The Moving Coffins of Barbados:


There is a famous legend on the island of Barbados of coffins that are moved by unknown forces. Though the details surrounding the phenomenon are sketchy, the enigma is one that has fascinated researchers for over a century.The events took place in the Chase Vault, located in a West Indian cemetery. The vault, situated about seven miles from Bridgetown, is a large structure built for the Chase family and their close friends. It was built roughly half above and half below the ground, which allowed for some degree of protection from the elements.The vault was slowly filled with the dead members of the Chase family. The first placed inside the vault was Mrs. Thomasina Goddard, in a simple wooden coffin built in July, 1807. Two-year-old Mary Ann Chase was placed in the vault the very next year. The older sister of Mary Ann, Dorcas Chase, was put into the vault on July 6, 1812. Some claim that Dorcas starved herself after her father forced her into depression. Nonetheless, a few weeks later her father, Thomas Chase, was placed into the vault. Legend says that Thomas was one of the most hated men in Barbados.

When the Chase Vault was open for the burial of Thomas the funeral party was stunned to find that none of the coffins were in the proper place. The group was angered- the theory being that grave robbers found a way into the grave and tossed the coffins about in search of loot. The entrance was a problem for robbers- a gigantic rock slab was cemented in place, covering the only entrance. Each time the vault was opened the cement had to chipped away and several men were needed to move the rock. Eventually it was decided that the gravediggers had some how disturbed the coffins.

The coffins were replaced and the lead coffin of Thomas Chase was put in place. The vault was then resealed as it had been before.

On September 25, 1816 the vault was opened for the burial of eleven-year-old Charles Brewster Ames. Similar to the previous instance, each of the coffins was misplaced and thrown about- including the two hundred forty pound coffin of Thomas was thrown from its resting place! The vault was put back in order and resealed once again.

Fifty-two days later, Samuel Brewster was to be buried. This time a large group of witnesses crowded the scene looking for the mystery to continue. The slab of stone, which covered the door, was carefully examined. No defects were found, and the vault was opened. To no ones surprised the vault was once again in disorder. Mrs. Goddard’s coffin, the only wooden one placed in the vault, was badly damaged. It was wrapped in wire to keep it together.

Several investigators, including the Reverend Thomas Oderson, examined the vault. Nothing could be found that would indicate a cause for the strange happenings, so the vault was once again cleaned and sealed.

On July 17, 1819 the vault was once again opened and once again the vault was found to be in disorder. The only coffin untouched was the wooden and fragile one of Mrs. Goddard’s. This time, the governor of the island, Lord Combermere, ordered his own professional investigation. The entire vault was looked over, and nothing strange could be found. The coffins were restacked and sand was placed on the floor to catch the footprints of the perpetrators. Mrs. Goddard’s wooden coffin was stacked against a wall since it was so frail. The vault was then resealed and personal seals of the governor were placed on concrete. Everyone of the island waited for the next reopening.

The next opening of the vault was not for a burial but for the Governor’s curiosity. On April 18, 1820, the Governor and several friends traveled to the vault and found his seal unbroken. When the vault was opened, however, it was found that the coffins were in disarray - some were even flipped upside down! The sand revealed no footprints.

The coffins were promptly removed from the vault and buried elsewhere on the island. Upon inspection, the vault was found to contain no water, and no way for water to enter it. Earthquakes were also eliminated- why would the quakes only affect one section of the chamber and leave the wooden coffin alone?

Some have speculated that the entire event never took place. Records show, however, that the Chase vault has and did exist. The vault is and has been for sometime? empty.

The House of Count Lemo in Puno, Peru

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Flight 401:

Perhaps the most extraordinary and credible research into the ghost phenomenon ever documented is the so-called “Ghosts of Flight 401.” On December of 1972, an Eastern Airlines Tri-Star jetliner, Flight 401, crashed into a Florida swamp. The pilot, Bob Loft (on the left), and flight engineer Don Repo (on the right), were two of the 101 people who perished in the air crash. Not long after the crash, the ghosts of Loft and Repo were seen on more than twenty occasions by crew members on other Eastern Tri-Stars, especially those planes which had been fitted with parts salvaged from the Flight 401 wreckage. The apparitions of Loft and Repo were invariably described as being extremely lifelike. They were not only reported by people who had known Loft and Repo, but their ghosts were also subsequently identified from photographs by people who had not known Loft and Repo.

drneverland:

tomatotaster:

eridanbooty:

photoncerberus:

the-grudge-girl:

Hide and Seek Alone

Playing hide-and-seek-alone is quite popular in various parts of Asia. Those who have tried it report that it actually works and that they felt their lives were threatened.

You will need:

  • A doll with legs. (The doll serves as a place for the spirit to enter, therefore it is advised that you not use a human doll or a doll that you really like because there is a great chance that the spirit will not leave the doll.)
  • Rice (The spirit that eats this offering is said to grow stronger)
  • Red thread (This symbolizes blood and acts of restraint)
  • Something from your body (Fingernails are the most commonly used, but some use their own blood, skin, hair, etc. Don’t use someone else’s body parts or else it becomes a curse.)
  • Weapon (Something to stab the doll with so that you can anger it. Real knives are dangerous, so most people use pencils or needles.)
  • Salt water or alcohol (Without this, the game won’t end. This material is used to get rid of the spirit.)
  • Hiding place 
  • A name (Giving the spirit a name is the most powerful thing a human can give. Names give spirits great power.)

Step 1: Cut the doll and replace its insides with rice. 

Step 2: Place something from your body into the doll. 

Step 3: Wrap the doll with the red thread thread as if to hinder it. 

Step 4: In a bathroom, pour water into a large washbasin and find some place to hide. 

Step 5: Place a cup of salt water in the place before starting the game. 

To play:

Step 1: Start at 3 A.M. because that is the time when spirits are most active

Step 2: Give the doll a name 

Step 3: When the clock strikes three, close your eyes and say “First tagger is (doll name)!” three times. (If you’re talking to the doll, you must talk sternly.)

Step 4: Go to the bathroom and place the doll in the washbasin. 

Step 5: Turn off all the lights

Step 6: Close your eyes and count to ten. Ready your your weapon and head to the bathroom. Go to the doll and say “I found you (doll name)!” and stab the doll. Afterward, close your eyes again and say “Now (doll name) is it!” three times

Step 7: Place the weapon next to the doll and go to your hiding place. You MUST lock the door as well as all other doors and windows.

Step 8: Drink the salt water, but do not swallow or spit it out. The salt water will protect you from the spirit. 

To end:

When you want to end the game, take any leftover salt water or alcohol and find the doll. Keep in mind that the doll may not be in the bathroom and there have been instances of it being outside. When you find the doll,  Spray the salt water in your mouth on the doll and do the same with the excess water you have left. Close your eyes and shout “I win! I win! I win!” The spirit in the doll will give up and and the game ends. It is advised to dispose of the doll by burning it. 

Important:

  • Keep the game under two hours. After two hours, the spirit in the doll will be too strong to be removed.
  • You must play alone. The more people there are, the higher the chances of someone getting possessed.
  • Don’t go outside
  • When hiding, BE SILENT
  • Turn off all electronics before starting
  • When running away, DO NOT LOOK BACK. Also, don’t fall asleep while playing. The doll might stab you. 
  • When discovered by the doll, you can get a small wound or even get possessed. If found by the doll, be careful because your weapon will be somewhere on the floor or in your pocket.
  • After the game is over, it is important to lean up properly. Be sure to put salt in every corner of the house, especially places where you put the doll and where you found it. Salt is said to scare away spirits. 

People who have played have reported some of the following events that usually take place while playing:

  • TV changing channels on its own
  • Perfectly normal lights flickering 
  • Doors opening and closing
  • Hearing the sound of laughter
Latoon Fairy Tree:
"A lone hawthorn bush in Lantoon, County Clare, Ireland, believed to have been a stopping-point on a fairy path"

Latoon Fairy Tree:

"A lone hawthorn bush in Lantoon, County Clare, Ireland, believed to have been a stopping-point on a fairy path"

Epworth Parsonage Poltergeist:
“This is known as a classic case of poltergeist activity, which occurred in December 1716 at the Parsonage in Epworth, Lincolnshire. All members of the Wesley family heard loud rappings and noises over a period of two months. Sometimes the noises were of a specific character, according to the well-kept notes of Mrs. Wesley. During one incident when she and her husband were descending the stairs one day they heard a noise as if someone was emptying a large bag of coins at their feet. This was followed by the sound of glass bottles being “dashed to a thousand pieces.” Other sounds heard were running footsteps, groans, and a door latch being lifted several times.”

Epworth Parsonage Poltergeist:

This is known as a classic case of poltergeist activity, which occurred in December 1716 at the Parsonage in Epworth, Lincolnshire. All members of the Wesley family heard loud rappings and noises over a period of two months. Sometimes the noises were of a specific character, according to the well-kept notes of Mrs. Wesley. During one incident when she and her husband were descending the stairs one day they heard a noise as if someone was emptying a large bag of coins at their feet. This was followed by the sound of glass bottles being “dashed to a thousand pieces.” Other sounds heard were running footsteps, groans, and a door latch being lifted several times.”